One-Eyed Jacks / 1961 / Part 6 / The Cast / Slim Pickens

5 Sep

Pickens and Johnson

Pickens and Johnson? Sounds like a Law Firm or something. Well, Slim Pickens and Ben Johnson ARE indeed members of a unique and small fraternity: Real Cowboys who became Westerns Movie Stars. There would definitely be a small group around that campfire. And both of them had major parts in One-Eyed Jacks.

And they had yet another distinction: they’ve both been in so many Westerns that it would be pretty well impossible to list them all here.

Slim Pickens

One Eyed Jacks Slim Pickens 2

Wikipedia: “Born, Louis Burton Lindley, Jr. (June 29, 1919 – December 8, 1983), known by the stage name Slim Pickens, was an American rodeo performer and film and television actor who epitomized the profane, tough, sardonic cowboy, but who is (possibly) best remembered for his comic roles, notably in Dr. Strangelove and Blazing Saddles.

Pickens was an excellent rider from age 4. After graduating from High School he joined the rodeo. He was told that working in the rodeo would be “slim pickings” (very little money), giving him his name, but he did well and eventually became a well-known rodeo clown.

After twenty years on the rodeo circuit, his distinctive Oklahoma-Texas drawl (even though he was a lifelong Californian), his wide eyes and moon face and strong physical presence gained him a role in the western film, Rocky Mountain (1950) starring Errol Flynn. He appeared in many more Westerns, playing both villains and comic sidekicks to the likes of Rex Allen, John Wayne, Steve McQueen, … many many other Stars.”

One Eyed Jacks Slim Pickens 3

One Eyed Jacks Slim Pickens 4

Slim and Trim

One Eyed Jacks Slim Pickens 6

Yee Haw!!

10 of Slim’s Best

slim pickens westerns 1

slim pickens westerns 2

slim pickens westerns 3

slim pickens westerns 4

slim pickens westerns 5

Next:

Ben Johnson

The Magnificent Seven … 2016

2 Sep

SIx Shooter Bar

The Magnificent Seven (2016) will be released Sept. 23 in theaters across North America.  It will also premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival announced on Sept. 8 as the festival’s opening night attraction.

We won’t have to long to wait to see if this Remake is going to be Heroic – or shot down.

THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - Denzel Washington

Unfortunately there are signs of trouble.

How so?

Most every Movie these days is ‘Pre-Screened’  – viewed by test audiences. The feedback from these Pre-Screening sets certain things in motion. If response from Pre-Screening is GOOD, almost nothing else needs to be done. Celebrate and release the Movie.
If NOT, other things can happen.
Certain scenes may be reshot, added, or edited.
If the response is TERRIBLE, the Movie might straight to DVD – No Distribution – and hope for some sales there while not incurring any more expenses.
That couldn’t happen to this movie – it’s a highly anticipated big production remake of a Western Classic. And it has Denzel Washington.
Yet if the Pre-Screening feedback either POOR or UNFAVORABLE – then more Promotion and Advertising might be in order – to bump interest.
This seems to be what is happening with The Magnificent Seven (2016). I have NEVER seen as many Trailers for ANY Movie that has ever existed than what we see for The Magnificent Seven (2016). I’ve almost lost count, but I’d guess there’s about 15 so far!! Including recently profile Trailers for each of the Seven characters. 

That’s a bit scary.

Not necessarily an indication, but …

Trouble in the Industry

And there’s other things to fear. The Movie Industry has been taking some major hits in general. This summer nearly every anticipated Summer Blockbuster lost money. Millions – and Multi-Millions. They were scorched. And unfortunately for Film Makers, this is not just indicative of poor economy, but of radically changing Viewing Trends by audiences. I believe Home Theatres, large TV Screens, and easy access to movies on your TV via Netflix, Shomi, and other Entertainment services are deeply cutting into the Theatre market. And this is not just a flash trend – it will continue – and become even more so. The Theatres and Film Makers had better catch on quickly. Very quickly. We are living in an age where markets can radically change and swing overnight. Volatile.

Hopes

All this being said, I hope the New Seven is great. Though we all love the original Magnificent Seven  a Classic – and I have no expectations that this will match that, that doesn’t mean I wish any evil on this Remake. I like Denzel Washington and most of Cast are pretty decent.

We’ll just have to see …

THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - poster 1 THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - poster 2 THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - poster 3 THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - poster 4 THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - poster 5 THE MAGNIFICENT 7 2016 - poster 6

Gene Wilder … Cowboy 2

31 Aug


long train running / doobie brothers
Mustang Bar

The Frisco Kid
(1979)

The Frisco Kid poster 1 The Frisco Kid poster 2 The Frisco Kid poster 3

When The Frisco Kid came out (1979), Wilder and Harrison
were both Billed pretty well equally.
But Harrison was already in Star Wars (1977) and his Star was going nova.

The Frisco Kid Rotten Tomatoes ReviewThe Frisco Kid IMDB review

By the time the DVDs showed up, Harrison
had almost pushed Gene right off the covers.

Blazing Saddles Warner Bros logo

The Frisco Kid Gene Wilder 2The Frisco Kid Gene Wilder3

The Frisco Kid Harrison Ford

Reeellly !!!??

The Frisco Kid Gene Wilder 4

The Frisco Kid Harrison Ford 2The Frisco Kid Gene Wilder 5The Frisco Kid Gene Wilder 6The Frisco Kid Trivia
– from Internet Movie Database IMDB

  • The working title for the film was “No Knife.”
  • The sixth and final Western Directed by Robert Aldrich. Aldrich’s earlier Westerns were Apache (1954), Vera Cruz (1954), 4 for Texas (1963), Ulzana’s Raid (1972) and The Last Sunset (1961).
  • Gene Wilder says that John Wayne was offered the part that was eventually played by Harrison Ford. Said Wayne loved the role and was eager to work with Wilder. However, an agent tried to offer Wayne less than his usual fee and the legendary actor turned the film down. This may be true, but unlikely. By 1979 Wayne was too ill with stomach cancer to consider film work, and in fact he died later that year from the disease. If it is true, it would be an interesting coincidence since Mel Brooks offered Wayne a role in Blazing Saddles – the only other Western that Wilder made.
  • Not the first Western for Harrison Ford. Ford appeared in Westerns when he was unknown in television and in such films as Journey to Shiloh (1968) and A Time for Killing (1967). However, The Frisco Kid (1979) would be Ford’s last Western until Cowboys & Aliens (2011) (Which I don’t consider a Western – MFW)
  • One of a number of Hollywood Westerns that were a flop at the box-office during the late 1970s / early 1980s. Others included Barbarosa (1982), The Mountain Men (1980), The Villain (1979), Goin’ South (1978), Hard Country (1981), The Frisco Kid (1979), Cattle Annie and Little Britches (1981), and The Legend of the Lone Ranger (1981).

Mustang Bar

Gene Wilder Career Awards and Nominations

  • 1962 Won Clarence Derwent Award / Best Performance by an Actor in a Non-featured Role / The Complaisant Lover
  • 1968 Nominated Academy Award / Best Supporting Actor / The Producers 
  • 1971 Nominated Golden Globe Award / Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy / Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory
  • 1974 Nominated Academy Award / Writing Adapted Screenplay / Young Frankenstein 
  • 1976 Nominated Golden Globe Award / Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy / Silver Streak
  • 2003 Won Primetime Emmy Award / Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series / Will & Grace

Mustang Bar

Harrison Ford The Frisco Kid

The Frisco Kid Harrison Ford 3

Gene Wilder … Cowboy

31 Aug

Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder made only 2 Westerns – the immensely popular Blazing Saddles (1974) and The Frisco Kid (1979).

Though a comedy, I’d guess a good number of Western fans would put Blazing Saddles in their Top Ten favorite Westerns.

Mustang Bar


Blazing Saddles Theme / Frankie Laine

Blazing Saddles banner

Blazing Saddles poster 1 Blazing Saddles poster 2 Blazing Saddles poster 3 Blazing Saddles poster 4

Blazing Saddles IMDB review Blazing Saddles Rotten Tomatoes review

(Rather Amazing) Blazing Saddles Trivia from IMDB

  • Mel Brooks wrote the movie out of anger at “white corruption, racism, and Bible-thumping bigotry.”
  • One studio executive stopped Mel Brooks in an elevator at the Warner Brothers lot and told him that several scenes were offensive and needed to be cut in order for the picture to be released. Brooks nodded and agreed to be polite even though he had no intention of changing a thing, being that he had final cut written into his contract.
  • Mel Brooks never told Frankie Laine that the theme song “Blazing Saddles” was for a comedy. Laine thought it was a dramatic western. Brooks was worried that Laine wouldn’t sing it with conviction if he knew the truth. When Brooks advertised in the show business trade papers for a “Frankie Laine-type” voice to sing the film’s title song, he was hoping for a good imitator. Instead, Laine himself showed up at Brooks’ office two days later, ready to do the job.
  • The original plan for the film was to have Alan Arkin direct with James Earl Jones playing Bart.
  • Upon a chance encounter with John Wayne, Mel Brooks asked him to be in the movie. According to Brooks, the Duke turned down the offer the next day by saying, “Naw, I can’t do a movie like that, but I’ll be first in line to see it!”
  • At the beginning of the scene in which Mongo awakens chained up in the sheriff’s office, when Bart (Gene Wilder) is hanging up posters on the board, there is a wanted poster already hanging up on the wall. This same wanted poster can be seen on the wall in the jail house in the John Wayne movie Rio Bravo (1959).
  • Brooks humor is not everybody’s brand of whisky. When the film was first screened for Warner Brothers executives, almost none of them laughed and the movie looked to be a disaster that the studio would not release. However, Mel Brooks quickly set up a subsequent screening for the studio’s employees. When these regular folks laughed uproariously throughout the movie, Warners finally agreed to take a chance on releasing it.
  • In the DVD commentary, Mel Brooks said that the working title for the film was “Tex X”, as a reference to black Muslim leader Malcolm X. It was then switched to “Black Bart”, then to “The Purple Sage”. In either case, neither he nor the other writers thought those were great titles. Brooks says that one morning he was taking a shower and the words “Blazing Saddles” suddenly popped into his head. When he got out of the shower, he pitched the title to his wife, actress Anne Bancroft, who liked the idea, and that’s how the movie ended up with its title.
  • When Harvey Korman‘s character purchases a ticket at the Grauman’s Chinese Theater box office, you can see the original film title, “BLACK BART” in the poster case in the background.
  • Hedy Lamarr sued Mel Brooks over the use of the name Hedley Lamarr and settled out of court. Mel said he was flattered by this attention and even made a reference to the lawsuit in the movie.
  • Supposedly, this movie officially marks the first time the sound of farting has ever been used in a film (at least according to the filmmakers in the DVD Documentary). According to Mel Brooks, they came up with the idea after watching numerous old westerns where cowboys only consume black coffee and plates of beans.
  • Production began with Gig Young as the Waco Kid. On the first day of shooting, the scene where the drunk Waco Kid hangs from a bunk asking if Bart is black, Young revealed that he really was indeed drunk (he had had an alcohol problem for years) and proceeded to undergo a physical collapse on set. Brooks shut down production for a day and Gene Wilder flew cross country to take over the role. Young later sued Warner Bros. for breach of contract.
  • Mel Brooks also asked Johnny Carson to play the Waco Kid; he refused.
  • The role of Bart was intended for Richard Pryor, but due to the controversial nature of Pryor’s stand-up routines of the day and his background, Brooks couldn’t secure financing for the project with Pryor in that role. So Pryor was made a co-writer of the script, and Cleavon Little played Bart. Pryor later got to star in a different western comedy – Adiós Amigo (1976).
  • Dom DeLuise has claimed that the role of the director of the film-within-a-film, “The French Mistake”, was originally meant to be played by actor Peter Sellers. However, after Brooks endured an exhaustive four-hour audition, he instead cast DeLuise.
  • The bull that Mongo rides has “YES” painted on one side and “NO” painted on the other. This is apparently a reference to the practice in the 1950s of marking the back of school buses for which side was safe to pass on, essentially inferring that Mongo and his mount are as big as a bus.
  • Over 70 stuntmen worked on this film, many of them doubling as extras.
  • A large photo of Edward G. Robinson can be seen hanging on the commissary wall during the pie fight.
  • Cameo: Count Basie: leader of the jazz band in the desert. The song being performed is ‘April in Paris’ written by Vernon Duke and E.Y. Harburg in 1932.
  • Mel Brooks: [fourth wall] often breaks the “fourth wall”, having the actors speak directly to the audience.

Gene Wilder Blazing Saddles

Blazing Saddles Cleavon Little Blazing Saddles Slim Pickens Blazing Saddles Harvey Korman Gene Wilder Blazing Saddles 2 Blazing Saddles Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder Gene Wilder Blazing Saddles 3 Gene Wilder Blazing Saddles 4

Mustang Bar

One-Eyed Jacks / 1961 / Part 5 / The Cast / Brando’s Westerns

25 Aug

Marlon Brando’s (reworked) Westerns

Thom Hickey over at The Immortal Jukebox (https://theimmortaljukebox.com/) just posted a LIKE on a post I did back in 2013 called Brando’s Western Trilogy. (Thanks Thom!)

However, that post needs some very serious editing. I blatantly omitted Viva Zapata (1952). This movie starred Brando, Jean Peters, and Anthony Quinn – and was Directed by Elia Kazan with a screenplay written by John Steinbeck. If you ever wonder if there really was something special about Brando just consider this: his second movie A Streetcar named Desire was also directed by Elia Kazan and the screenplay was written by Tennessee Williams. Viva Zapata was his third film – again Directed by Kazan – with the screenplay written by Steinbeck. That’s pretty amazing really.

Viva Zapata posters 1 Viva Zapata posters 2 Viva Zapata posters 3 Viva Zapata posters 4 Viva Zapata posters 5 Viva Zapata posters 6 Viva Zapata posters 7

Viva Zapata banner

Viva Zapata Brando

Viva Zapata Jean Peters

Jean Peters

Viva Zapata Anthony Quinn

Anthony Quinn

Viva Zapata Henry Silva

Henry Silva has a small part

Viva Zapata Brando 2


Kazan

Elia Kazan

From Internet Movie Database (IMDB): Kazan Directed 21 different actors in Oscar-nominated performances: James Dunn, Celeste Holm, Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire, Anne Revere, Jeanne Crain, Ethel Barrymore, Ethel Waters, Karl Malden, Vivien Leigh, Kim Hunter, Marlon Brando, Anthony Quinn, Eva Marie Saint, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger, Jo Van Fleet, James Dean, Carroll Baker, Mildred Dunnock and Natalie Wood. Dunn, Holm, Malden, Leigh, Hunter, Quinn, Brando, Saint and Van Fleet all won Oscars for their performances in Kazan films.

Kazan Quotes on Brando (IMDB):

“To my way of thinking, his performance in On the Waterfront (1954) is the best male performance I’ve ever seen in my life.”

“He was deeply rebellious against the bourgeois spirit, the over-ordering of life.”

“Every word seemed not something memorized but the spontaneous expression of an inner experience – which is the level of work all actors strive to reach.”


Steinbeck

John Steinbeck

steinbeck film 2 steinbeck film 3 steinbeck filmsteinbeck film 4


Viva Zapata Academy Awards

Anthony Quinn won the 1952 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

The film was also nominated for:

  • Best Actor in a Leading Role – Marlon Brando
  • Best Writing, Story and ScreenplayJohn Steinbeck
  • Best Art Direction – Set Decoration, Black-and-White – Lyle R. Wheeler, Leland Fuller, Thomas Little, Claude E. Carpenter
  • Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture – Alex North

BAFTA Awards

Marlon Brando won the 1953 BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actor. The film was also nominated for Best Film from any Source.

Cannes Film Festival

At the 1952 Cannes Film Festival, Brando won for Best Actor, while Elia Kazan was nominated for the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film.

Directors Guild of America

Elia Kazan was nominated for a DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures in 1953.

Golden Globe Award

Mildred Dunnock was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1953.


The Appaloosa (1966)

One of My Favorite Westerns

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Oglpgqb52Q

The Appaloosa Poster

The Appaloosa - Brando 3 The Appaloosa - Brando 5The Appaloosa - Saxon Sombrero 4The Appaloosa - Sombrero 6

 


 Missouri Breaks 1976

the missoui breaks poster The Missouri Breaks - Brando 2 The Missouri Breaks Nickolson The Missouri Breaks - Harry Dean Stanton The Missouri Breaks - Randy Quaid The Missouri Breaks

One-Eyed Jacks / 1961 / Part 4 / Karl Malden

22 Aug


mireille-mathieu / canta-en-espac3a3c2b1ol-la-paloma

SIx Shooter Bar

Karl Malden

March 22, 1912 – July 1, 2009

One Eyed Jacks karl malden One Eyed Jacks karl malden 2 One Eyed Jacks karl malden 3 One Eyed Jacks karl malden and brandoSIx Shooter Bar

Malden also previously starred with Brando in
A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
and
On the Waterfront (1954)

SIx Shooter Bar Malden Westerns

the gunfighter poster

the hanging tree poster

one eyed jacks poster

how the west was won postercheyenne autumn posternevada smith posterblue posterwild rovers poster

One-Eyed Jacks / 1961 / Part 3 / The Cast

22 Aug


me and my uncle / distant sons

SIx Shooter Bar

Marlon Brando
(1924–2004)

 Did the camera like this guy? 

The combination of Talent, Charisma, and Sex Appeal is hard to come by.
And when it is found, a silent prayer goes out:
“God, don’t let them screw it up.”

One Eyed Jacks Brando 2

Like a Roman God, by Jove!

One Eyed Jacks Brando

One Eyed Jacks Brando Life cover

One Eyed Jacks Brando 5 One Eyed Jacks Brando 6 One Eyed Jacks Brando 7 One Eyed Jacks Brando 8 One Eyed Jacks Brando 9 One Eyed Jacks Brando 10 One Eyed Jacks Brando 11 One Eyed Jacks Brando 12 One Eyed Jacks Brando 13

SIx Shooter BarOne Eyed Jacks Marlon Brando - The ContenderSIx Shooter BarOne Eyed Jacks Marlon Brando 14

 

%d bloggers like this: