Tag Archives: Eli Wallach

Eli Wallach revisited …

27 Jun

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Eli Wallach

Eli Herschel Wallach (December 7, 1915 – June 24, 2014)

“I never dreamed I would do Westerns.”
~ Eli Wallach

In his acting career Wallach appeared in approximately 90 films and 85 Television shows.

Incredibly, though Eli Wallach appeared in only 6 Westerns, at least 3 are considered Classics: John Ford’s How the West was Won  (1962), The Magnificent Seven  (1960) and The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly  (1966) .
Not bad shootin’ … for a badguy.

“My first Western was called The Magnificent Seven.”
~ Eli Wallach

Eli Wallach Western Filmography

The Magnificent Seven (1960)
How the West Was Won (1962)
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
Mackenna’s Gold (1969)
Long Live Your Death (1971)
Shoot First… Ask Questions Later (1975)

Eli Wallach - The M7

 

“As an actor I’ve played more bandits, thieves, killers, warlords, molesters, and Mafiosi than you could shake a stick at.”
~ Eli Wallach

Below is my favorite Wallach scene from the The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

I heard Wallach say that Director Sergio Leone basically gave him free rein to improvise that scene any way he wanted.
Nicely done.

“I always end up being the evil one, and I wouldn’t hurt a fly.”
~ Eli Wallach

eli wallach 3

Eli Wallach passes …

25 Jun

Eli Wallach, star of The Magnificent Seven, dies at 98

From BBC News Site: http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-28012230

eli wallach 5
On screen, Wallach was frequently cast as “the bad guy”

Eli Wallach, whose films included The Magnificent Seven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, has died aged 98.

Character actor Wallach – who began his film career in 1956 after 10 years on stage – was admired for his wide range in a career spanning six decades.

His portrayal of bandit chief Calvera in The Magnificent Seven was regarded by many as his definitive role.

When he received an honorary Oscar in 2011, he was described as a “quintessential chameleon”.

Eli Wallach with Carroll Baker in Baby Doll
Eli Wallach with Carroll Baker in Baby Doll

Though he was never nominated for an Oscar during his 60-year career, the Academy rewarded him in 2011 for “effortlessly inhabiting a wide range of characters, while putting his inimitable stamp on every role”.

His films included the classic westerns How the West Was Won and The Misfits.

Arguably best known for his villains, he made a lasting impression as Tuco opposite Clint Eastwood, in Sergio Leone’s 1966 spaghetti western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

Years later, Wallach said strangers would recognise him and start whistling the distinctive theme tune.

Eli Wallach (centre) in The Magnificent Seven
Eli Wallach (centre) as Calvera in The Magnificent Seven

“As an actor I’ve played more bandits, thieves, warlords, molesters and mafioso than you could shake a stick at,” the Hollywood Reporter quoted him as saying.

He was also successful in light comedy and appeared in many TV shows, including playing Mr Freeze for a spell in the 1960s Batman TV series.

The veteran star continued making films into his 90s, making his last big screen appearance in Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps in 2010.

His death was confirmed by his daughter Katherine in the New York Times.

Eli Wallach with Clint Eastwood in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Eli Wallach with Clint Eastwood in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Wallach was born on 7 December 1915 in Brooklyn to Polish Jewish immigrants.

He graduated from the University of Texas, initially intending to become a teacher.

But his focus shifted to acting, and after serving in World War II he studied at the Actors’ Studio, where he became a practitioner of method acting.

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson
Wallach, with his wife Anne Jackson at the premiere of The Holiday in 2006

He first appeared on the New York stage in 1945, where he met his wife Anne Jackson, to whom he was married for 65 years.

Wallach made his London debut in 1954 with The Teahouse of the August Moon.

His screen debut came two years later, playing an unscrupulous seducer in Baby Doll.

The role earned him a Golden Globe nomination for best supporting actor and a Bafta award for most promising newcomer.

But the theatre remained Wallach’s first love. “For actors, movies are a means to an end,” he told the New York Times in 1973.

”I go and get on a horse in Spain for 10 weeks, and I have enough cushion to come back and do a play.”

He became a household name as Calvera in 1960’s The Magnificent Seven, alongside Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson and James Coburn.

He went on to earn an Emmy in 1967 for his supporting turn in the drama Poppies Are Also Flowers, and picked up four further nominations – most recently for his guest turns in Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip (2007) and Nurse Jackie (2010).

Other notable roles came in How the West Was Won, Mystic River, The Holiday, Lord Jim, and The Godfather: Part III, playing an ill-fated Mafioso.

Asked about possible retirement, he told the Times in 1997: ”What else am I going to do? I love to act.”

Eli Wallach with (l to r) Anne Bancroft, Ben Stiller and Jenna Elfman in Keeping the FaithEli Wallach with (l to r) Anne Bancroft, Ben Stiller and Jenna Elfman in Keeping the Faith

The Magnificent 7 Update 2 … project revived ??

11 Jan

Britt (Coburn): “Nobody throws me my own guns and says run. Nobody.”

From:

The Playlist

‘Magnificent Seven’ Remake Continues With New Writer, But Loses Tom Cruise

http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/magnificent-seven-remake-continues-with-new-writer-but-loses-tom-cruise-20131226?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

BY KEVIN JAGERNAUTH
DECEMBER 26, 2013 10:00 AM

MGM are leaving no stone unturned in their catalogue when it comes to remakes. With “Robocop” and “Poltergeist” on the way for 2014, and “Road House,” “Death Wish,” “WarGames,” “The Idolmaker,” “Ben-Hur” and more all in development, the name of game seems to reboots over original material. And that brings us to the classic western “The Magnificent Seven.” In the works for a couple years now, the project gained some serious steam when Tom Cruise put his name to it in 2012, with a writer added over this past summer. But heading into 2014, the redo will need to find another star as a screenplay gets more work.

The Wrap reports that John Lee Hancock (“The Blind Side,” “Saving Mr. Banks”) has been brought in to re-write the first draft of the script by Nic Pizzolatto (“True Detective”). For now, it’s just a writing gig for Hancock who has no plans to direct, but with credits to his name including “The Alamo,” “Snow White & The Huntsman” and next year’s “Maleficent,” he knows his way around spectacle. Meanwhile, Tom Cruise has exited the project mostly because his plate is currently full with about five zillion other movies on the go, so he could probably do with one less.

So the remake machine continues on this project, and we’ll ask you this: who do you think can direct or star in this movie and at least attempt to do justice to the original?

__________________________________________________

My Favorite Westerns: 

I’ve already posted my own fantasy cast which I will boldly match up against anybody else’s projections.
Except for Tom Cruise, of course, who has now bailed out. This leaves a VERY large hole – as casting Yul Brynner’s former role was the biggest challenge of them all.

My Favorite Westerns casting for The Magnificent Seven / Remake:

Yul Brynner … TOM CRUISE

Brynner - Cruise

Steve McQueen … VIGGO MORTENSEN

Steve McQueen - Viggo Mortenson

James Coburn … GUY PEARCE

James Coburn - Guy Pearce

Charles Bronson … WILLEN DAFOE

Charles Bronson - Willem Dafoe

Robert Vaughn … BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH

Vaughn - Cumberbach

 Brad Dexter BRENDAN FRASER

Brad Dexter - Brendan Fraser

Horst Buchholz AARON PAUL

Horst Buchholz - Aaron Paul

Eli Wallach … ANTONIO BANDERAS

Eli Wallach - Antonio Banderas

O’Reilly (Bronson): “I admire your notion of fair odds, mister.”

 

The Magnificent 7 Update … project in jeopardy

11 Jan

From: 

express_logo

By: Mike Parker

Published: Sun, December 29, 201

http://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/films/450888/Tom-Cruise-shoots-down-Magnificent-Seven-remake

Tom Cruise shoots down Magnificent Seven remake

TOM CRUISE’s departure from a planned remake of the star-studded western has put the project back to square one

CLASSIC The original 1960 cast

HOLLYWOOD studio MGM has “called in the cavalry” to rescue a planned remake of classic 1960 western The Magnificent Seven after Tom Cruise stunned producers by quitting.

Cruise, 51, blamed a personal “scheduling conflict” for his departure more than six months after agreeing to a lead role.

As he rode off into the sunset, studio bosses hired John Lee Hancock, who directed current box-office hit Saving Mr Banks, to re-write what was seen as a troubled script.

The turmoil comes at the end of a year in which the original Magnificent Seven was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry of America’s Library of Congress for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant”. It starred Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and Horst Buchholz.

Yesterday a senior MGM source said: “Tom’s departure has thrown a real wrench in the wagon wheel.

“He was the only one of the seven we had cast and would obviously have helped draw other A-list stars into the project.

“Now it’s a case of going right back to square one in terms of casting and having John Lee Hancock re-write the script from top to bottom. You might say he’s leading our cavalry on a rescue mission.

“We’re hoping that once John Lee has completed a first draft of a new script, we will be firmly back on track and in a position to attract some of Hollywood’s best-known actors.”

Hancock, a hugely respected Hollywood figure, is no stranger to the genre, having directed 2004’s Disney remake of another 1960 western classic, The Alamo.

Even before Cruise backed out, studio bosses had become concerned about committing a reported £100million-plus to the film. They saw rival Disney take a financial hit earlier this year as an equally costly remake of The Lone Ranger with Johnny Depp as Tonto, flopped.

Los Angeles-based media analyst Mike Raia insisted yesterday: “I believe the western can survive and even thrive as a genre.

“However, the onus is on the filmmakers to make their modern versions resonate with today’s younger audiences as well as older fans.”

 

The Magnificent Seven … ??? Casting Eli Wallach …

22 Sep

The Magnificent Seven …
Casting Eli Wallach / Calvera

“My first Western was called The Magnificent Seven.”
~ Eli Wallach

eli wallach 5

Eli Herschel Wallach (born December 7, 1915)
Eli Wallach is 97 years old.

In his acting career Wallach appeared in approximately 90 films and 85 Television shows.

“I never dreamed I would do Westerns.”
~ Eli Wallach

Eli Wallach Westerns

The Magnificent Seven (1960)
How the West Was Won (1962)
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
Mackenna’s Gold (1969)
Long Live Your Death (1971)
Shoot First… Ask Questions Later (1975)

Wallach says he once received a letter from the Pope who told him that his favorite Wallach Movie was The Magnificent Seven.

eli wallach 1

“As an actor I’ve played more bandits, thieves, killers, warlords, molesters, and Mafiosi than you could shake a stick at.”
~ Eli Wallach

Below is my favorite Wallach scene from the The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

I heard Wallach say that Director Sergio Leone basically gave him free reign to improvise that scene any way he wanted.
Nicely done.

Bandito ?

Amazingly, by today’s standards for Western Badguys, Wallach was a pretty nice chap. In The Good, the Bad and the Ugly he may be Ugly and ornery, but he’s basically comic relief, while Eastwood and Van Cleef handle the drama.

Likewise, in The Magnificent Seven, after Wallach and his gang get the drop the Seven, he merely scolds them … and then lets them go! THEN, he gives them back their guns !!! Nice guy. The Seven promptly ride back and kill all the bandits – including Wallach.

He’s also pretty clean … nice red shirt and vest … no tortilla stains, no spitting, cussing, abusing, raping … a little bit of pillaging … but that’s it.

And those peons … in immaculate white togs.

Fact is, the Mexican government was furious at the way Mexicans were depicted in a previous Western, Vera Cruz (starring Burt Lancaster and Gary Cooper) and therefore placed people on the set whose job it was to censor any negative depictions of Mexico or Mexicans.

Funny, but nobody seems to notice this … unless someone points it out.
Sorry.

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“I always end up being the evil one, and I wouldn’t hurt a fly.”
~ Eli Wallach

eli wallach 3

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The Magnificent Seven ??? …
Casting Antonio Banderas as Calvera

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