Jesse James (1939): Blood Brothers / Part 3

Jesse James / 1939, Shenandoah, The Long Riders


Shenandoah / The Brothers Four

Wikipedia: “Oh Shenandoah” (also called simply “Shenandoah” or “Across the Wide Missouri“) is a traditional American folk song of uncertain origin, dating to the early 19th century. The song appears to have originated with Canadian and American voyageurs or fur traders traveling down the Missouri River in canoes, and has developed several different sets of lyrics. Some lyrics refer to the Oneida chief Shenandoah and a canoe-going trader who wants to marry his daughter.”

Not sure why, but as a kid I always related the song to the American Civil War – especially the South. It’s older that that though. It’s a beautiful song, but to me it’s also sad. Like a lament for unrequited Love. Yet inspiring. I first heard this song on Harry Belafonte’s  Classic live double album Belafonte at Carnegie Hall (1959). Harry was at his peak at that time and he does a superb job on it. Here The Brothers Four have a great interpretation.

Fitting.

“Having a great time in West Virginia. Home soon.”

A staged photo? Probably not. Lots of kids picked up a rifle. And knew how to use it.

Blood Brothers Part 4 next…

2 thoughts on “Jesse James (1939): Blood Brothers / Part 3

  1. Such a great song.Brothers Four do indeed do it justice. And as for Belefonte At Carnegie Hall, one of my favorite records. Never knew about it’s origin might have been French fur traders.

    1. Hi Don,
      There’s many songs I didn’t know where they originated. Sometimes we don’t really know – or there’s so many versions.
      I grew up with that Belafonte album. A great performance – a Classic album.
      Brothers Four – I like to remind people of these great artists.
      Yeah.

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