Tag Archives: Jesse James / 1939

Moving along …

11 May


long as i can see the light / marc cohn / written by john fogerty

Mystery Unresolved

OK I failed to resolve my brothers problem of why he can’t access site. I talked to WordPress Support – detailing the issue. They checked things and said that anybody should be able to find my site and make comments –
they are not blocking ??
Not sure what else I can do. I’ll keep my ear to the ground
and see if I can figure this thing out.

Onward

I’m going away for a week.
Sorry – won’t be able to work on the blog.

However:
Projects I’m working on: 

Tyrone Power / Swashbuckler / Zorro
Featuring that Prince of Fiends: Basil Rathbone!

Posters: Jesse James Films
Fun – but a lot of work finding and fixing
those old posters.

The Death of Jesse James 
Depictions of his assassination in Film.
But most Jesse James don’t depict this at all!

I’ve really enjoyed working on this Jesse James thing. (Bet you couldn’t tell).
Not really finished yet either. He’s an incredible study of
Western Lore and Legend.
It seems his Iconic stature outweighs the evil that his did. ??

Well … you fool some of us humans,
but … the Big Guy is not so easy.

Stay tuned.

Jesse James / The Long Riders / Stunting Revisited

2 May


jesse james / ry cooder

Stunts: Jesse James and Long Riders 

Back on April 5, I made a post called Jesse James (1939): The Stunt of Infamy. It detailed an stunt in the movie whereby a horse was killed. This stunt led to the creation of the The American Humane Association (AHA) – an organization that monitors animal safety in film making (among related concerns). 

Ironically, 41 years after the this original incident, The Long Riders (1980), openly commits more animal safety infractions – while duplicating stunts from this original film?!

Here is the AHA review of The Long Riders:

AHA was not informed of the animal action prior to filming, but confirmed via screening the film on May 19, 1980 that two obvious horse trips occurred. In one fall, a horse landed on its back and in the other fall, the horse did a dangerous forward somersault. Since it was deemed that these falls could not be achieved without the use of tripping wires, AHA rated the film Unacceptable.”

Below is a clip from Jesse James (1939). Apart from the famous stunt I mentioned it shows no horse trips, but does show another questionable stunt: jumping horses through a window. Yes, we know that’s not real glass, but you have to wonder …

Below is a reprise the same stunt in The Long Riders – plus we see one obvious horse trip. Then the horses are jumped through two windows! Little wonder they wouldn’t want the AHA to monitor this. 

WHO ??? ME ?!

Director Walter Hill was a Peckinpah fan. Not hard to tell.

AHA Movie database and Reviews:

However over 90 percent of Movies monitored by the AHA pass the safety checks.
Most Movie Directors and Producers do care.

Here’s a few that didn’t pass:

Stagecoach (1939)
Horses are tripped with great abandon in this Classic.
Ben-Hur (1925)
In 1925, it’s a certainty that the safety of either beast – or man – was of no concern.
Heaven’s Gate (1980)
The reputation of this film is damaged anew.
The Wild Bunch (1969)
In one scene Sam Peckinpah collapsed a whole bridge full of horses and riders into a river.

AHA Guidelines for Producers / Film Makers 

Video Conversion – Geezer Style

1 May


Wind is Bound to Change / Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers

Video Conversion – Geezer Style

I just spent many hours trying to get a video clip from The Long Riders. I was using VLC Video Player (a great little device) and I could easily get a good video clip – but with no sound. The original movie video was in a format called ts = ‘Transport stream’ and I could not figure out how to get the Audio. I fumbled and bumbled for many hours – first trying to convert the original clip to MP4 – or ANY format that might work. I looked at several YouTube videos (another useful asset), but nothing worked. (I bet any kid could have shown me how to do this in one minute). I’d been trying to figure this out this Video Clip thing for weeks because a video clip can really enhance a Post. It has to be a simple Video Editor or I’m lost.

FINALLY – FINALLY!!! I got one configuration to work.
Now I can’t remember how I did it.
Easy stuff for some people.
Not for me.

Coming: Jesse James and The Long Riders / Part 8

 

Jesse James and The Long Riders / Part 6 / Reviews

25 Apr


Closer Every Day / The Doobie Brothers

Reviews

Reviews were Good.
But that was in 1980. 
Over time some Movies gain in appreciation.
May even become Classics.
But others decline.
Action Movies may become ‘Dated’ 
if the Action doesn’t measure up
to modern standards.

The Long Riders?
Quite a bit of Peckinpah inspired Action 
and
 bloodshed to be sure – and some impressive stunts.
And the movie has strong Star Power.

So … right now …
I’m going to give it a 7 out of 10.

Just curious … why do you need 9 guys to rob a bank?
Even the real James – Younger gang had 8 at Northfield?
I figure a single person can rob a bank?
Not that I’m an expert.

Outstanding in their field

More Posters

I Cavalieri dalle Lunghe Ombre means
The Knights with Long Shadows
A very nice interpretation.

Hermanos Rebeldes Bandidos” means
Rebellious Bandit Brothers
Excellent.

Forajidos de Leyenda means
Outlaws of Legend
Nice.

Freres Rebelles Hors-la-loi Heros” means
Brothers Rebels Outlaw Heroes
and
“Le Gang des Freres James” means
The James Brother Gang
Fine with me.

Bruder Rebellen Outlaws Heldenmeans
Brother Rebels Outlaws Heroes
Yup.

Don’t know what it says, but it’s very nice

Coming: Jesse James and The Long Riders / Part 7

Jesse James and The Long Riders / Part 5

25 Apr


southside of heaven / ryan bingham

 

Jesse James: Blood Brothers and The Long Riders / Part 4

25 Apr


midnight rider / greg allman

The Long Riders has been made on faith and idealism.”
 – Stacy Keach

The Carradine brothers
as The Youngers

The Keach brothers
as The James’ brothers 

The Quaid brothers …
as The Miller brothers

The Guest brothers
as The Ford brothers

So who gets Top Bill?

Brothers Randy and Stacy Keach were Cast as Jesse and Frank James – and were also Executive Producers of the Movie.
And Co-Writers of the Movie.
And you’d expect Jesse and Frank James to be the main Characters in the movie. Right?
So the Keach boys should get Top Bill. Right?

Nope.

The Carradines were Top Billed on the Movie Posters
and on the Film Credits.

Were the Carradines bigger Stars at that time? Guess so?

Or was there some agreement?

Don’t know?

WIKIPEDIA: “In order to make the movie, David Carradine forfeited his customary profit participation; the Keach brothers gave up the extra profit percentages they were entitled to as executive producer in order that the Carradine brothers got the same amount of profits. When the film went over its original $7.5 million budget, the Keaches forfeited their executive producer fees. “The Long Riders has been made on faith and idealism,” said Keach.”

In the end, the movie Cost: $10,000,000 (estimated)
and 
Made: $23,000,000, USA, June 1981.

Incredibly, that very same year, (1980) another Western by United ArtistsHeaven’s Gate, completely decimated the company.
It’s one of the most infamous stories in Filmdom where Director Michael Cimino was responsible for massive overruns in budget and time …
(But that’s another story)

Blood Brothers Part 5 next…

Jesse James (1939): Blood Brothers / Part 3

23 Apr


Shenandoah / The Brothers Four

Wikipedia: “Oh Shenandoah” (also called simply “Shenandoah” or “Across the Wide Missouri“) is a traditional American folk song of uncertain origin, dating to the early 19th century. The song appears to have originated with Canadian and American voyageurs or fur traders traveling down the Missouri River in canoes, and has developed several different sets of lyrics. Some lyrics refer to the Oneida chief Shenandoah and a canoe-going trader who wants to marry his daughter.”

Not sure why, but as a kid I always related the song to the American Civil War – especially the South. It’s older that that though. It’s a beautiful song, but to me it’s also sad. Like a lament for unrequited Love. Yet inspiring. I first heard this song on Harry Belafonte’s  Classic live double album Belafonte at Carnegie Hall (1959). Harry was at his peak at that time and he does a superb job on it. Here The Brothers Four have a great interpretation.

Fitting.

“Having a great time in West Virginia. Home soon.”

A staged photo? Probably not. Lots of kids picked up a rifle. And knew how to use it.

Blood Brothers Part 4 next…

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