Tag Archives: Sedona

John Wayne Tree 2013 / Part 2

16 Jul


Take it to the Limit / The Eagles

So Nick, our Guide/Driver, says there’s something else he wants to show us close by.
Lead on …
He points to a nearby tree and says: “See this tree?”
“This is John Wayne Tree”. 

What?! Really!! How so?
Nick says that back in 1947 when John Wayne was starring in Angel and the Badman
John had posed by this tree for a photo.
I now recalled seeing that photo somewhere? but I’ve been able to find it since.
This did seem seem to be an amazing coincidence though because there’s no way Nick could have known
that I had a blog called My Favorite Westerns where I had 
extensively featured The Duke.

Nick claimed John posed something like this.
(Notice how I bear absolutely no resemblance to John Wayne who was without a doubt
about one of the most photogenic Celebrities who ever lived.)

But I really had to wonder though at the odds of this??
We hadn’t planned on taking Jeep Tour at all and these Jeep Tours go to many different locations in the area.
Yet here we were.
Pretty amazing.

Angel and the Badman / 1947

1947.
One year before I was born. 

A John Wayne Production

John Wayne was 40 years old.
He was a Star, but had not yet achieved
the unparalleled heights of SuperStardom
he ultimately reached.

Eight years earlier John had Starred the most important Western ever made: Stagecoach.
Directed by John Ford which raised Western Film from pulp to 
legitimate Art. 
This had been also John’s breakthrough role as a Western Hero. 

Available to watch on You Tube.

The End

John Wayne Tree 2013 ——————-The Full Story / Part 1

10 Jul


Take it Easy / The Eagles

Sedona Jeep Tour 2013

I never really did tell the full story of our John Wayne Tree adventure at Sedona back in 2013.
My previous posts on this were lousy so I want to fix that.

In Sedona my pardner, Rose, won a Jeep Tour prize by getting sucked into a TimeShare presentation. That was the hook. I was quietly kicking Rose for making me endure the TimeShare thing, but we would never have gone on this Jeep Tour otherwise. Life and Fate, however, often have a different idea that they only let us in on when we’re right in the middle of it all. Sometimes wonderful things happen. Sometimes not. This turned out to be pretty wonderful. 

So off we go.

When you realize how many Jeep Tours there are here and the many different places they go,
you have to realize what an amazing coincidence this event turned out to be.

Schnebly Hill Road

History of Sedona | Sedona Heritage Museum

A bit of history:
Theodore Carleton (T C) Schnebly and his wife SEDONA Arabella Miller Schnebly
moved to the Sedona area in 1901.

Schnebly Hill Road, of course is named after them and Sedona after her.

The Hill road is an adventure in itself.
Below you can see one stretch of the road – and why they use Jeeps.
All six of us were all well strapped in, but we still needed to hold on to our saddlehorns.
At one point we saw a family in a minivan coming up the road.
You can bet they regretted that.

Photo from the Internet.

Nick, our driver, was giving us a running commentary on the area as we bumped along.
(Can’t remember a thing.)

Nor was there much chance for taking any pics on the way up.


But we did snap a couple.We jostle and jerk our way up to see a viewpoint Nick calls Schnebly Hill Vista
… and jump out for a jaunt.

I look back down and see the old timer still sitting in the jeep. (below)
(He was a very unhappy camper to be along on this excursion – and didn’t hide it.)

Possibly another victim of a TimeShare pitch.

Hiking up a short, but steep little path and arrive at the Viewpoint … 

AWESOME!

Nick was right. This is a hell of a viewpoint.

You can literally see for miles.
Sedona in the distance.

There are a lot of such vista views around Sedona area.

We clamour around a bit enjoying the view.

But the best was yet to come …

Next:

John Wayne Tree

 

Sedona … Faces of the Cathedral

2 Jul


Native American Style Flutes / Scott August

I’d guess that Cathedral Rock in Sedona is one of the most photographed places in North America. 
I’ve taken many pics of it myself.

There are dozens of pics of Cathedral rock on the Internet taken by much better photographers than I.

But it’s pretty well impossible to come here and not take a couple of pics of this. 

“You can’t swim at Oak Creek Crossing.” he said. “It’s too shallow.”
“That’s your water.” I answered.

 

Sedona … Revisited

30 Jun


Shadows of Sedona / Scott August

I’ve been to Sedona on and off since the early 70’s.
On my first visit I hiked up to Cathedral Rock.
There were no trails or pathways going up there in those days. 
And no people. 
I enjoyed a moment of pure solitude.
That evening I swam at Oak Creek Crossing as the sun set.
Native ladies and their children came down to sit on the rocks to enjoy a serene twilight. 
It was truly a magical moment and a once in a lifetime experience.
I was One with them. 
Sedona is not the sleepy secret it used to be,
but I hope there is still some solitude and peace to be found here. 

 

Sedona water hole …

2 Oct


Sedona Spirit / Keith O’Sullivan

I’ve been going to Sedona, Arizona on and off since the 70’s. Love that place. Back then although Sedona and it’s Waterhole weren’t really a secret, things weren’t overly crowded either. That changed. Some major magazine (was it Look?) published an article on America’s great waterholes. Next thing you know the place was packed. Now it’s called Slide Rock State Park. And you have to pay to get in. Like many National Parks in the US and Canada the whole area has become a Tourist Trap. Frankly, many Parks are being ruined by too many visitors. Hell, Yellowstone has had traffic jams for years. Banff National Park in Canada will soon be forced to limit access. Just too many people. And if you want to camp in most any major Park up here you have to book WAY ahead. Sometimes a year ahead. It’s a crisis situation. Some Parks I visited you can’t even take a photo without 10 people in it. Or more. ??? So I’ve been dismayed for many years on how badly Sedona is being impacted. Jeep Tours, ATV rentals, mountain bikers, motocross cycles – a lot of different things. The place is being destroyed. When I hiked up to Cathedral Rock back in the 70’s I felt like I was in a remote area. Not now. Most of the following photos are from a visit in 2013 (?). Here’s what it looked like that day. We snuck in – it woulda costs 20 bucks otherwise.

Here’s where we snuck in. I hear they have guards of Wardens there, but we never saw any. ??

 When it’s hot that water is sweet.

 You can see how gorgeous it is there, so I can’t really blame folks.

 It was HOT so I sat in the shade for a bit. Look how young and wonderful I was.

That’s Rose on that little bridge.

The famous Water Slide.

We didn’t have any swim gear so we did a bit of wading …

… and cooled our feet.

BOY ! Did that feel good !!

You bet !

But if you don’t want the crowds you can still hike into spots up creek.

Or you can always take a dip back the hotel. It’s nice … but NOT the same.

And one time ... long ago ... back in the early 70's ... on a warm summer evening I swam at famous Oak Creek Crossing beneath Cathedral Rock. What a magic moment that was!And one time … long ago … back in the early 70’s … on a warm summer evening 
I swam at famous Oak Creek Crossing beneath Cathedral Rock. What a magic moment that was!

%d bloggers like this: