Tag Archives: Harry Carey Sr.

Red River Revisited …

6 Mar


Red River / Main Theme / Dimitri Tiomkin

Tom Dunson’s tragic decision.“I’ve made up my mind.”

Leaving Fen behind.

Goodbye Tom.
– Colleen Gray

“Why do Indians always want to be burnin’ up good wagons?”
– John Wayne with Walter Brennan.

“Never liked seein’ strangers. This is ’cause no stranger ever good news’d me.”
– Brennan, Mickey Kuhn, and Wayne.

“Get a shovel and a Bible.”

“Give me ten years and I’ll have that brand on the
gates of the greatest ranch in Texas.”

“Nice. Awful nice.”
– John Ireland with Montgomery Clift

“There are only 2 things more beautiful than a good gun.
A Swiss watch or a woman from anywhere.”

“Ever had a Swiss watch?”

“You’re as good as they say you are. Maybe as good as me.”

“I think he’s bluffin.”
– Noah Beery Jr., Brennan, and Clift.

Night watch: Wayne, Clift, Harry Carey Jr. 

“You’da shot him right between the eyes.”

“Just a sure as you’re standing there.”

“Go ahead. Say it.”

“You wuz wrong Mr. Dunson.”

“You think I’m to blame for that?”

“Just as sure as you’re sitting there.”

Crossing the ‘Red’.

Calm in the midst of the storm.

“I’m the law.”

“I’m going to kill you Matt.”

Joanne Dru

“Do you remember?”

“I can remember.”

“We’re looking for Abilene.”
– Beery and Clift.

“Welcome to Abilene.” 
– Harry Carey Sr., Clift, Ireland, and Beery. 

Showdown.

“You know that young man isn’t going to use his gun don’t cha?”

“Yeah. But I haven’t any such notion.”

“Go ahead … Draw!”

“I said Draw!”

“OK I’ll make ya!”

“Go ahead, beat each other crazy …”

“Use this … “

Henry Hathaway Director of Westerns / Man of the Forest / 1933

25 Jul


home from the forest / lightfoot

Man of the Forest / 1933

I got stuck a bit on this one for. My impression was that this film was more popular than most films in it’s time. I wanted to verify that, but there’s not a lot of history on many of these early Westerns. So my investigation dragged on, but … it has some pretty nice posters and images.

Scott looks a bit like and early Errol Flynn.
Fortunately he later turfed the ‘stache’.

No Trailers available.
However Man of the Forest is classified Public Domain.
http://publicdomainmovies.net/movie/man-of-the-forest

This is one of 20 Zane Grey stories, filmed by Paramount in the 1930s, which they sold to Favorite Films for re-release, circa 1949-1950. The failure of Paramount, the original copyright holder, to renew the film’s copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film. (From Internet Movie Database IMDB)

Henry Hathaway / Sunset Pass / Kathleen Burke …

3 Jul


Remember

Sunset Pass / 1933

Kathleen B. Burke (September 5, 1913 — April 9, 1980) was an American movie actress of the 1930’s, and former model.
Kathleen was a dental assistant in Chicago, before winning a talent contest sponsored by Paramount Pictures to play Lota the “Panther Woman” in Island of Lost Souls (1932 – You gotta pay your dues.), the first screen version of H.G. Wells’s novel The Island of Dr. Moreau. The contest allegedly had 60,000 applicants from around the country.
This led to more than a film career of 22 moves over six years, usually as the leading lady along side of Randolph Scott (Sunset Pass and Rocky Mountain Mystery), Gary Cooper, Cary Grant, Buster CrabbeCharles Laughton, Spencer Tracy, W.C. Fields, George and Gracie Allen, Ronald Coleman,  Rosalind Russell
Her final film role was in 1938, whereupon she retired from screen acting at the age of 25 !!!

Sunset Pass 1933Island of Lost Souls (1932)

Henry Hathaway / Sunset Pass / Harry Carey …

23 Jun


sons of the pioneers

Sunset Pass / 1933

I got this notion that I would give some of the Support Cast in Sunset Pass a nod. That would be Harry Carey, Kathleen Burke, and Noah Beery Sr. (I’ll do a whole thing on Randolph Scott at a later date. That will be a huge project.)

In my usual Western ignorance I didn’t realize that Harry Carey had been a Living Legend in early Westerns and had a massive film legacy. Soooo …

Wikipedia: Harry Carey (January 16, 1878 – September 21, 1947) was an American actor and one of silent film’s earliest superstars. He is credited on Internet Movie Database (IMDB) with 267 acting credits. One of his best known performances is as the President of the Senate in the drama film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He was the father of Harry Carey Jr., who was also a prominent actor. Throughout the 1920s Carey was a Western Superstar who occasionally assumed screenwriting, producing and directing assignments.

In the 1948 John Ford film, 3 Godfathers, Carey is remembered at the beginning of the film and dubbed “Bright Star of the early western sky


Harry Carey Jr., John Wayne, and Pedro Armendariz

John Wayne said that Harry Carey “was the greatest Western actor of all time,” and paid a tribute to him by holding his right elbow with his left hand – imitating a stance Carey himself often used in his films – in the closing shot of at the end of John Ford’s classic The Searchers (1956), when he walks away from the character played by Carey’s widow Olive, and is framed by the doorway in the final scene.  According to Wayne, both he and Olive wept when the scene was finished.

In 1976, Carey was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

In 1987, his name was emblazoned along the Walk of the Western Stars on Main Street in Old Town Newhall in Santa Clarita, California. (His son, Harry Carey Jr. was also honored in 2005).

The Outcasts of Poker Flat (1919) directed by John Ford
Harry in one of his trademark poses – leaning on the saddlehorn.
Harry was the Leading Man in many early Westerns.
Remarkable photo: 
Early Film Crew
From Rodeo cowgirl Vera McGinnis’s photo album includes young John Ford (seated fourth from left, with cowboy hat and glasses) and Harry Carey Sr. (seated third from right). Harry Carey Jr., said the photo looked to be taken in 1917, in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, California, where the duo had filmed many of their early films. Carey Sr. and Ford made 26 silent Westerns, but only three have survived. Sadly, the rest “rotted in the cans,” Carey Jr. told True West. “Nobody bothered to even try and save ’em.”
– courtesy Jendreau family collection
Illustration of an article in The Moving Picture World. “From left to right: Bud Osborne, rider and steer bulldogger ; Joe Rickson, champion Roman rider ; Tommy Grimes, champion bucking horse rider ; Pedro Leon, the man who can rope fifteen riders with his lariat ; Neal Hart, former Wyoming sheriff and range rider ; Harry Carey, and Bill Gillis, Texas cowpuncher and all-round rider of bucking horses and steers.”
MFW: Quite a few early Western Film Actors were real cowboys – or had ‘earned their spurs’.
Harry had a ranch.
Harry Carey / The 3 Godfathers / 1948
Only the Hero gets to kiss the gal.

Harry eventually had to step back. 
But he never stepped out.
 Marked Men (1919)
West is West (1920)
That looks like a flush Harry. 
The Last of the Clintons (1935)
No comment.
 

 

%d bloggers like this: