Quetzalcoatl- The Plumed Serpent Awakens

10 Jul


Path to the Yucatan / Caleb Hennessy

The recovery of the ancient Mayan cities – their Temple Pyramids – which are the Mayan churches –
has been a revelation to the modern Maya and a revival of Mayan religious traditions. 

Video borrowed from YouTube

“According to legend, twice a year when the day and night are in balance, this pyramid dedicated to Kukulcan (or Quetzalcoatl), the feathered serpent god, is visited by its namesake. On the equinox, Kukulcan returns to earth to commune with his worshipers, provide blessing for a full harvest and good health before entering the sacred water, bathing in it, and continuing through it on his way to the underworld.”
https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/pyramid-kukulcan-chichen-itza

Modern depictions of Quetzalcoatl/Kukulkan.
Said to be The God of knowledge and learning – among other things.
Creator of the Calendar and books.

Kukulkan / Quetzalcoatl obviously still has a powerful appeal.

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kukulkan:
“The cult of Kukulkan/Quetzalcoatl was the first Mesoamerican religion to transcend the old Classic Period linguistic and ethnic divisions. This cult facilitated communication and peaceful trade among peoples of many different social and ethnic backgrounds. Although the cult was originally centred on the ancient city of Chichén Itzá in the modern Mexican state of Yucatán, it spread as far as the Guatemalan highlands.”

Akeviz
“A spiritual city in the highlands of Guatemala; one of the smaller communities of Spiritual Travelers who are still connected with the ancient civilizations of the Mayans;
promotes the ancient mysteries of the once powerful Mayans and Aztecs.”

– A Cosmic Sea of Words / Harold Klemp

“… in other traditions Quetzalcoatl was said to oppose human sacrifice. Mesoamerican priests and kings would sometimes take the name of a deity they were associated with,
so Quetzalcoatl and Kukulcan are also the names of historical persons.
He was known as the inventor of books and the calendar, the giver of corn to mankind, and sometimes as a symbol of death and resurrection.
Quetzalcoatl was also the patron of the priests and the title of the Aztec high priest.”
https://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikispeedia/wpcd/wp/q/Quetzalcoatl.htm

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