YUCATAN … Day 1

27 Feb

Mayan Empire


TEMPLO MAYOR (MUSICA PREHISPANICA)

The Temple of Kukulkan.
Wearing my Tomb Raider hat. 

I never thought I’d ever get down here. Felt it was beyond my means. But we threw all our money in the pot and off we went.
People come here for different reasons: some to drink and party; some to veg and rest. I come for the adventure. I truly wanted to see all these Mayan Temples, Pyramids and Artifacts. Impossible in one shot. This was a huge dynastic culture that spanned several thousand years and is spread all over Central America. And they are finding more and more every year. In fact, they don’t have enough people or money to get at it all.

When I was a kid I wanted to be an Archeologist or Paleontologist. That didn’t happen, but I’ve never lost my keen interest in Ancient History. This trip to a small part of the Yucatan – Chichen Itza and EK Balam – was just a teaser. But wonderful.

Checking in late. Plane delayed for de-icing in Calgary. 

Looking around.

Looks … rather opulent. 

Looking forward to a little adventure.

Thot I’d pick up a couple of souvenirs.

Easy does it … This will look good on my mantle …

YA BABY !!

14 Responses to “YUCATAN … Day 1”

  1. Don Ostertag February 27, 2019 at 2:10 pm #

    Wonderful place isn’t it.

    • jcalberta February 27, 2019 at 4:26 pm #

      It really is Don. Have you been down here?

      • Don Ostertag February 27, 2019 at 5:42 pm #

        Oh yes. We probably been down there 20 times. My wife is from Mexico City and the Yucatan is one of our favorite places.

      • jcalberta February 27, 2019 at 10:55 pm #

        I hope to see those big pyramids in Mexico City some day. That would really be something.

      • Don Ostertag March 1, 2019 at 3:11 pm #

        They really are. Read up on the largest pyramid in the world’ the one in Cholula just outside Mexico City and it’s unbelievable history.

      • jcalberta March 1, 2019 at 7:49 pm #

        Thanks Don. I will check that out. Kukulkan’s pyramid has a lot of amazing features too.

      • Don Ostertag March 8, 2019 at 8:52 am #

        Here’s something that just came out a few days ago. https://nytimespost.com/maya-treasure-trove-archaeologists-stumble-across-priceless-hoard-of-artefacts/ I thought would interest you seeing as how you were just in Chichin Itza

      • jcalberta March 8, 2019 at 9:11 am #

        Thank you very much. Yes I am definitely interested. Anything they find on the Mayans is hugely important since the Spaniards destroyed so much. Much is still unknown and just guesswork.

      • jcalberta March 1, 2019 at 8:01 pm #

        Don, I found something interesting in January/February National Geographic in a article about Jesse James. I recall what you said about the quality of Jesse James horse. In the article it says this: “There is no mistake, however, in identifying the fine mare abandoned by the bandits: it was a champion racehorse named Kate, and it’s owner was one Jesse James.” (Page 86). There you go. Pretty good article if you want to pick it up.

      • Don Ostertag March 3, 2019 at 1:37 pm #

        Found it. Thanks JC. In my much younger days I loved going down to Northfield for Jesse James Day. They reacted the defeat of the James boys and then the celebration began. Old fashion fun time.

  2. maui1 February 27, 2019 at 5:20 pm #

    This a great blog post on Yucatan and the history of the Mayan Empire.
    These are also great pictures of your trip.

  3. Mai.j March 18, 2019 at 11:03 am #

    Thanks for sharing, these are great! I have always loved ancient Mexican civilizations and the archeology. Like you said, there is so much there, with more is being found all the time. However, there are insufficient resources for excavating.

    • jcalberta March 19, 2019 at 10:15 am #

      Recent tech has discovered many, many new sites and pyramids. It would take millions of dollars, many people and many years to excavate all these sites. A couple of very large pyramids have been uncovered off the beaten track – you need a helicopter to visit those. 3500 years of an incredible civilization that we still don’t know a lot about.

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