Louise Brooks – Overland Stage Raiders (1938)

23 Jan

Louse Brooks – Pandora’s Box / Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark

The Three Mesquiteers:
Overland Stage Raiders (1938)

Overland Stage Raiders is perhaps most famous for being the last film that Louise Brooks appeared in.

Louise Brooks on John Wayne:
“This is no actor but the hero of all mythology miraculously brought to life… John was, in fact,
that which Henry James defined as the greatest of all works of art – a purely beautiful being.”

IMDB Trivia:
“This was the final film of Louise Brooks. NOTE: Contrary to popular belief,
this was not intended to be her “comeback” film;
she made it because she needed the money. She was paid $300 (equal to $5180,
adjusted for inflation in 2017) for the film.
Not long after it was released, she was found working as a salesgirl at Saks Fifth Avenue
at a salary of $40 (equivalent to $690 in ’17) a week.”

Much could (and has) been written about Louise. Let’s say was a beautiful and controversial Star
and still has a large following of admirers.

The 3 Mesquiteers (1938 Edition) John Wayne, Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune with Louise Brooks

It puzzles me that Overland Stage Raiders plays so loosely with
Western Movie traditions by using buses and planes, etc.
but then fail to exploit Louise Brooks immense charisma and sex appeal???
But lots of things puzzle me.

“I have been taking stock of my 50 years since I left Wichita. How I have existed fills me with horror for I failed everything. Spelling, arithmetic, writing, swimming, tennis, golf, dancing, singing, acting, wife, mistress, whore, friend, even cooking. And I do not excuse myself with the usual escape of not trying. I tried with all my heart.”
– Louise Brooks

If there’s any one thing you could say about Louise it was that she had an incredible
amount of that mystical substance called Charisma.

1906 – 1985

 Judge for yourself.

I could easily post about 100 pics of Louise.

Her short bobbed hairstyle was her trademark sensation.
Imitated by many – achieved by few

“A well dressed woman, even though her purse is painfully empty, can conquer the world.”
– Louise Brooks

She starred in seventeen silent films and eight sound films.

On February 6, 1932, she filed for bankruptcy and began dancing in nightclubs to earn a living.
By 1946, she had to take a $40-a-week job as a sales girl at Saks Fifth Avenue to make a living.

“Love is a publicity stunt, and making love – after the first curious raptures –
is only another petulant way to pass the time waiting for the studio to call.”
– Louise Brooks

Was close friends with IT Girl Clara Bow.

Many photos of Louise have been colorized,
but I think the monochromes are still the best.

“The great art of films does not consist in descriptive movement of face and body,
but in the movements of thought and soul transmitted in a kind of intense isolation.”
– Louise Brooks

She left her home at age 16 to join a modern dance company.

“I have a gift for enraging people, but if I ever bore you, it’ll be with a knife.”
– Louise Brooks

“In my dreams I am not crippled. In my dreams, I dance,”
– Louise Brooks

Dance she did.

And still does.

2 Responses to “Louise Brooks – Overland Stage Raiders (1938)”

  1. Cindy Bruchman January 24, 2019 at 5:41 am #

    What a great tribute to Lousie! I love her. I know they say Clara Bow was the “it” girl, but I do believe it was Louise who did it first. What sex appeal. What a true trendsetter with that bob. Awesome.

    • jcalberta January 24, 2019 at 8:56 am #

      Although she had a Cultured upbringing, it was hardly ideal childhood. But she was a survivor. I think she had a bit of mission to challenge the conventions of her day. Which got her blacklisted. She had admirable qualities apart from her obvious beauty. Quite a lady.

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