Henry Hathaway Director of Westerns / RAWHIDE (1951) / Tyrone Power / Part 1 Updated

20 Mar


Nat

Tyrone Power

Roots that Run Deep

Tyrone Power I

Tyrone was the third Tyrone Power in the Acting profession.
– going all the way back to William Grattan Tyrone Power:
Irish stage Actor, Comedian, Author and theatrical manager.
Sometimes called Tyrone Power I.

Through his paternal great-grandmother, Anne Gilbert, Power was related to the actor Laurence Olivier; through his paternal grandmother, stage actress Ethel Lavenu, he was related by marriage to author Evelyn Waugh; and through his father’s first cousin, Norah Emily Gorman Power, he was related to the theatrical director Sir (William) Tyrone Guthrie, founder of the Stratford Festival (now the Stratford Shakespeare Festival) in Canada and the Tyrone Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We’re talking about an amazing heritage, linage and kinship in the Entertainment and and Acting fraternity/profession.

That’s a hell of a legacy.

Tyrone Power I was lost at sea in March 1841,
when the SS President disappeared without trace in the North Atlantic.
He was 46.

Tyrone Power II

Between 1886 and 1931 appeared worked in 47 Stage productions
– several Shakespearean.

Between 1914 to 1931 me appeared in 40 silent films
and one “Talkie“.
But that Talkie was interesting and notable. It was one of John Wayne’s
first Westerns, The Big Trail.

 Tyrone Sr. seemed to play a lot of badguys.

About as bad as you can get.

At home one night after shooting on the film ‘The Miracle Man‘ in 1931, he suffered a massive heart attack and died literally in the arms of his
17-year-old son, Tyrone Power.
He was 64 years old.

The Death of Tyrone Power

Madrid, Spain / November 1958. While filming the climactic swordfight scene with George Sanders for Solomon and Sheba, Power is suddenly stricken by a heart attack. He dies within an hour. 
Tyrone Power was 45 years old.

The son he had always wanted, Tyrone Power IV, was born 2 months after his death.
Young Tyrone active Actor with 21 acting credits.

UPCOMING:
Henry Hathaway Director of Westerns / RAWHIDE (1951) /
Tyrone Power / Part 2
and possibly a bit of Swashbuckling!

7 Responses to “Henry Hathaway Director of Westerns / RAWHIDE (1951) / Tyrone Power / Part 1 Updated”

  1. Don Ostertag March 20, 2018 at 10:13 am #

    I enjoy him in most of his movies. My wife loves him in all of his movies. The man certainly backed up his love for his country, and then even stayed in the Marine Reserves risking to be activated in Korea.
    Have to watch The Big Trail again to watch Sr. What a great bad guy.
    We had an actor during one season at the Guthrie Theater who was a nephew of Tyrone Jr. He did not have it to be able the family tradition though. Never heard of him since.

    • jcalberta March 20, 2018 at 5:22 pm #

      Hi Don.
      I noticed immediately Tyrone Power I as the founder of Guthrie Theatre and and thought of you. That’s interesting.
      This project is really difficult for me because most of his movies were made before I was born. I just haven’t seen that many.
      I believe he was a fine person and most everybody who knew him speaks highly.
      I will definitely give a nod to his important Service record.
      Downloaded Black Swan last and we’ve got our popcorn at hand !!

  2. Cindy Bruchman March 20, 2018 at 10:14 am #

    Nice commentary surrounding great posters. Good job, JC.

    • jcalberta March 20, 2018 at 5:23 pm #

      You are kind Cindy. I know I have to do a better job. It’s pretty sketchy. But fun.

      • Cindy Bruchman March 21, 2018 at 8:24 am #

        Just explain the story and why you like it. No one wants to read lengthy reviews. Teach us, master. ; )

  3. Marilyn Armstrong March 20, 2018 at 9:27 pm #

    I remember when he suddenly died. I was a kid and everyone kept saying how young he was. I was 11, so he sounded old to me. He did some great movies. If he had been around longer, I bet he might have made some great ones.

    • jcalberta March 20, 2018 at 10:25 pm #

      Zanuck controlled him for most of his early career and wanted to churn out commercial stuff, but Power wanted to do something that was serious and meaningful.
      He may have had some hereditary heart weakness, but smoking (as everybody did in those days) was a likely contributor. In the final swordfight scene (he was brilliant at that) he over-exerted. It was very hot in Madrid and Sanders (his opponent) was a lousy swordfighter – so they had keep re-shooting. That’s all it took.

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