Hugh O’Brian __________ Not your average Cowboy Pt 2

12 Sep


pale rider / the heavy horses

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Between 1950 and 1956 Hugh O’Brian had work in about 20 Westerns. Though these are from the Golden Age of Westerns I confess that I haven’t seen most of them. I recognize Vengeance Valley (1951) and Broken Lance ( 1954). Colin – over at Riding the High Country blog (https://livius1.wordpress.com/)  is an expert on Westerns from the 40’s and 50’s and could likely have some information on some of them.

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Amazingly, except for TV work, Hugh made next to NO Western films
between 1954 and 1990!

Except for one:
The Western Classic:
The Shootist

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But Hugh’s big break came in 1955 when he was offered the role of
Wyatt Earp in:

The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp
TV Series (1955–1961)

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Next:

Hugh O’Brian – Not your average Cowboy Pt 3
The Shootist / 1976

2 Responses to “Hugh O’Brian __________ Not your average Cowboy Pt 2”

  1. Colin September 12, 2016 at 6:44 pm #

    Firstly, thanks for the name check and the compliment – not sure I deserve such praise but I’ll take it anyway. 🙂

    O’Brian did make a few more westerns between ’54 and the end of the decade of course, including a few very impressive ones, but his output in the genre certainly did slow down considerably, and then essentially dried up altogether for a time. One reason is undoubtedly the time he was spending playing Wyatt Earp (obviously a western character) on television. He concentrated primarily on TV work in those years anyway and made fewer films generally. I think it’s also a reflection of the general trend of the era; the blossoming of the western on TV and its subsequent, and some might add consequent, decline in the cinema.

    • jcalberta September 14, 2016 at 5:36 pm #

      Thank you for that. Yes you deserve the praise because you keep these Westerns alive – and for the information about them. Many are in danger of being lost and a lot of them definitely worth watching.
      I know Hugh did some TV work in that span – mainly non-Western. I figure there’s a couple of Classic Westerns in his early work, but I haven’t seen most of them so I can’t say …

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