Tag Archives: Marlon Brando

The Appaloosa … parting shots …

4 Feb

Et tu Brando …

Screenshots: The Appaloosa 

The Appaloosa - Brando

The Appaloosa – Brando
“Amigos, Gringos, Compadres …“

The Appaloosa - Brando

The Appaloosa – Brando
“This was the noblest Gringo of them all.”

The Appaloosa - Brando

The Appaloosa – Brando
“To be, or not to be … “

The Appaloosa - Brando

The Appaloosa – Brando
“Whether ’tis nobler in the mind …”

The Appaloosa - Brando

The Appaloosa – Brando
“Alas, poor Pedro! I knew him … “

“I have decided to tell the story of my life as best I can, so that my children can separate the truth from the myths that others have created about me, as myths are created about everyone swept up in the turbulent and distorting maelstrom of celebrity in our culture.” ― Marlon BrandoSongs My Mother Taught Me

 

The Appaloosa Grande … Amigos …

4 Feb

3 Amigos

Don’t be fooled by their smiles …

The Appaloosa - 2 amigos

The Appaloosa – 3 amigos
John Saxon, Emilio Fernandez, Alex Montoya

… these are not your friends.

Nothing frames the face like a sombrero …
The Appaloosa - Sombero 6

The Appaloosa – Emilio Fernandez

The Appaloosa - Sombero 8

The Appaloosa – Brando

“There’s a line in the picture where he snarls, ‘Nobody tells me what to do.’ That’s exactly how I’ve felt all my life.”
- Marlon Brando
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/marlon_brando.html#5a8E93hCQ888oQ4c.99

The Appaloosa - Saxon Sombrero 1

The Appaloosa – John Saxon

The Appaloosa - Saxon Sombrero 2

The Appaloosa – John Saxon

“There certainly have been a lot of changes, although they come in such gradations that most people have either forgotten, or, if they’re too young, they never knew about them in the first place.”
- John Saxon
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/john_saxon.html#zdllIyCM3o8rPKck.99

The Appaloosa - Alex Montoya

The Appaloosa – Alex Montoya

The Appaloosa - Sombero 9

The Appaloosa – Alex Montoya

The Appaloosa - Emilio Fernandez

The Appaloosa – Emilio Fernandez

The Appaloosa … American Spaghetti …

1 Feb

Close Up and Personal 

Director Sergio Leone didn’t invent Close-Up shots, but he certainly was influential in their use. This is partly why The Appaloosa is often referred to as the “American Spaghetti Western” – as Director Sidney J. Furie uses close-ups extensively. The movie was also made during the height of Spaghetti Western popularity (1966) and has more than it’s share of Mexican banditos.

Leone’s Eyes … guess who ?

Leone's Eyes ...

Leone’s Eyes …

Eastwood, Van Cleef, Wallach, Bronson

Furie’s Eyes … In your face Amigo 

The Appaloosa - Close Ups

The Appaloosa – Screen shots – uncropped 

“The truth is, whether your film is about the great mythological character you have to do right, or it’s a little movie that nobody ever heard of, you still approach it like it’s the most important thing in the world. But failing goes with the territory. Filmmakers are like gunslingers, and you don’t win every duel.”

- Sydney J. Furie

Sydney J. Furie - Director

Sydney J. Furie – Director

The Appaloosa …

26 Jan

 A Breed of Renown …

Strangely, in The Appaloosa we don’t get to see the Appaloosa pony all that much – the movie is not really about the horse. But I still wish they had shown him more.  Truly a beautiful animal.
The pony in the movie was named Rojo.
 http://horsefame.tripod.com/appaloosa.html

Curiously enough, the recent film Appaloosa (2008) starring Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen also has nothing to do with a horse either. One wonders if the title isn’t a nod to The Appaloosa.

The Appaloosa - Brando

Brando with the Appaloosa – alas, one of the few good images in the movie.

The Appaloosa

The Appaloosa

The history of the Appaloosa Horse breed is much too involved to put here, but the Nez Perce Indians were responsible for the North American breed.

File:Nezperceindians1895ish.jpg

Nez Perce Indians with Appaloosa / 1895

 

The Appaloosa (1966) …

18 Jan

The Appaloosa (1966) 

When you do a search on Google for ‘Western Movies of 1966′ here is what you will likely find:
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, The Professionals, Nevada Smith, El Dorado,
Alvarez Kelly, Duel at Diablo, The Shooting, Navajo Joe,
… and a few others …

A few Western Classics mixed in with a few clunkers. But, all in all, a pretty impressive year for Westerns.

Yet on most of these lists there is one glaring omission:
The Appaloosa.
Why?

The Appaloosa a a good Western. It is well directed by Sydney J. Furie and has excellent Cinematography, and it has Brando and Saxon.
It also contains one of the most famous and powerful scenes in Western Film:
The famous scorpion arm wrestling scene with the between Saxon and Brando.

The Appaloosa - 1966

The Appaloosa – 1966

I am at a loss to figure out why this movie seems to have been so overlooked? Was there a big ‘hate on’ for Brando at the time?
Or was it a case of merely being overshadowed by two of the Greatest Western Classics of All Time: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, and The Professionals?
???

I hope to see it eventually take it’s rightful place.

The Missouri Breaks … Death in the wind …

13 Jan

Death in the wind …

Nickolson

Nicholson

Blood on the mind …

The Missouri Breaks - Blood on the mind ...

Nicholson

Vengeance in the Heart …

Nicholson

Nicholson

________________________________________________

The Missouri Breaks - Confirmed ...

The Missouri Breaks - Brando

The Missouri Breaks – Gardening in Montana

12 Jan

The Missouri Breaks:
The Hazards of Gardening in Montana

The Missouri Breaks - Nickolson, Brando

Nicholson encounters an unwelcome garden pest

During the entire production Jack Nicholson and Marlon Brando were only on the set on the same day just one time, despite their multiple scenes together.
IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074906/trivia
MFW: This would account for the fact that it’s almost impossible to find shots of them within the same frame.

The Missouri Breaks - Brando 7

The Missouri Breaks – Brando … Regulating

Marlon Brando’s performance was mostly improvised. Arthur Penn eventually gave up on him and decided to just let him act whatever way he wanted.
IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074906/trivia
MFW: Brando unprofessional behavior became the stuff of movie legend. But he didn’t seem to care. How profoundly this affected his career is hard to say.

MISSOURI BREAKS COREL

The Missouri Breaks – Brando … ruminating

Jack Nicholson didn’t like the fact that Marlon Brando used cue cards while filming. In their scenes together, Nicholson broke his concentration every time Brando shifted his gaze to the cue card behind the cameraman.
IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074906/trivia

The Missouri Breaks - Brando 5

The Missouri Breaks – Brando … killing cabbage

 “I’d like almost anythin better n bein burnt up.”

The Missouri Breaks - Brando 6

The Missouri Breaks – Brando …

Marlon Brando agreed to accept $1 million for five weeks work plus 11.3% of gross receipts in excess of $10 million.
IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074906/trivia

The Missouri Breaks - Jack Nicholson 2

The Missouri Breaks – Nicholson … If looks could kill

Jack Nicholson agreed $1.25 million for ten weeks work, plus 10% of the gross receipts in excess of $12.5 million.
IMDB http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074906/trivia

The Missouri Breaks – The Cast

12 Jan

The Missouri Breaks / Directed By Arthur Penn

The Cast:

The Missouri Breaks opening

The Missouri Breaks – Montana Territory

The Missouri Breaks - Nickolson

The Missouri Breaks – Jack Nicholson

“Regulator? Ain’t that like a dry gulcher?” 

The Missouri Breaks - Brando

The Missouri Breaks – Marlon Brando

“Well, that’s not the softest term you could use, I’d say.” 

The Missouri Breaks - Kathleen Lloyd 2

The Missouri Breaks – Kathleen Lloyd

“Why don’t we just take a walk and we’ll just talk about the Wild West and how to get the hell out of it!”

The Missouri Breaks - Randy Quaid

The Missouri Breaks – Randy Quaid

“Damn, I don’t know why they had to put Canada all the way up here.”

The Missouri Breaks - Harry Dean Stanton

The Missouri Breaks – Harry Dean Stanton

“The closer you get to Canada, the more things’ll eat your horse.”

The Missouri Breaks … Love ‘em or hate ‘em

11 Jan

The Missouri Breaks (1976)

The Missouri Breaks opening

Not one My Favorite Westerns. But … it has Brando and Nicholson / Star Power.

Frankly, it seems there are damn few movies of any type that are worth watching if they don’t have Stars in them. I hate to say that because you’d like to think otherwise. There are plenty of exceptions I’m sure, but in general – as far as Hollywood is concerned, this is pretty well a Rule. Maybe Rule #1. Certainly Director Sydney Pollock believed that. Which is why he made 7 movies starring Robert Redford. He knew that even if the movie was lousy or critically trashed that Redford would still put it over the top. And he did.

Don’t get me wrong – plenty of people like The Missouri Breaks and some consider it a great movie – even a great Western. It’s certainly worth at least one look just to see what Brando and Nicholson are up to. And they’re up to quite a bit.

Reviews/Ratings:

- Rotton Tomatoes: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/missouri_breaks/
Critics Score: 83% – Viewers Score: 58%

- DVD Savanthttp://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s1762miss.html
Movie: Very Good: “Even with its stellar teaming of Marlon Brando and Jack Nicholson, The Missouri Breaks was a big-bust movie in 1976 … Almost 30 years later, The Missouri Breaks plays a lot better … That ending is still a head-scratcher but most of the rest of the movie is a Western lover’s delight, with excellent and often hilarious dialogue between sad sack horse thief Nicholson and his pack of misfit rustlers. If anyone lets the film down, it’s Brando … “

- Internet Movie Database (IMDB): http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074906/?licb=0.3835491400677711
Viewers Rating: 6.5

- Turner Classic Movies (TCM)http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/28064%7C0/The-Missouri-Breaks.html
User Reviews: 4 out of 5
“The Missouri Breaks (1976) is not your usual Western. In fact, it’s not your usual anything. The words most commonly used in reviews at the time of its release were “bizarre” and “odd” and it must have equally confused audiences expecting something quite different from the inspired teaming of Marlon Brando and Jack Nicholson. But seen today, the film’s peculiar mixture of Western cliches, black comedy, quirky romance and revenge drama makes for a decidedly offbeat entertainment.”

Not a screen shot: Nicholson, Katherine Lloyd, Harry Dean Stanton, Brando

2 pics from http://www.anothermag.com/reader/view/4791/Acid_Westerns_Day

Brando and his Creedmore Rifle

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