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Stagecoach … Iconic Images …

31 Oct

Stagecoach Iconic Images 4

Stagecoach Iconic Images 6

Stagecoach Iconic Images 7

 

Stagecoach … Iconic Images

12 Oct

Stagecoach – Iconic Images

Stagecoach – Iconic Images 2

John Ford … man of substance … man of vision …

6 Oct

Stagecoach Wallpaper

“I am… a mushroom; On whom the dew of heaven drops now and then.” / John Ford

Documentary Biography: Directed by John Ford (1971)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066997/

“You can speak well if your tongue can deliver the message of your heart.” / John Ford

Directed by John Ford

John Ford Western Filmography

Information edited from Screen Junkies:
John Ford Western Movies – Jackie Barlow

/ http://www.screenjunkies.com/movies/genres-movies/westerns/john-ford-western-movies/

  • Rider of the Law” - 1919, black and white silent movie – Told of the adventures of  the Texas Rangers.
  • 3 Bad Men” – 1926, Ford’s last silent western. Filmed in the Mojave Desert and Jackson Hole, Wyoming.
  • Stagecoach – 1939, Ford’s first western with sound. Starring the unknown John Wayne, along with Claire Trevor, this movie is still the most admired and the most imitated of all the Hollywood movies.
  • MoDrums Along the hawk – 1939, Ford’s first Technicolor movie.  It co-starred Henry Fonda and Claudette Colbert.
  • My Darling Clementine – 1946, romanticized version of the legend of Wyatt Earp and the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Film’s starred Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp, Victor Mature as Doc Holliday, and Linda Darnell.
  • Fort Apache” – 1948, The first of Ford’s “Cavalry Trilogy”.  John Wayne, Henry Fonda, and also Shirley Temple in one of her last movie appearances. It was one of the first movies to present a sympathetic and authentic view of Native Americans.
  • She Wore a Yellow Ribbon” - 1949, second of the “Cavalry Trilogy”.  In Technicolor.
  • Rio Grande – 1950, Third part of the “Cavalry Trilogy” starred John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, and screen debut of Wayne’s son Patrick Wayne.
  • The Searchers – 1956, The only western Ford made in the 1950’s besides “Rio Grande”, this  movie was named “the greatest western of all time” by the American Film Institute in 2008. Featured the rising star Natalie Wood as well as Jeffrey Hunter, Vera Miles, Ward Bond, and others.
  • The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” – 1962, said to be Ford’s last great movie.  It starred John Wayne, Vera Miles, James Stewart, Edmund O’Brien, Andy Devine, Lee Marvin, Denver Pyle, and John Carradine.

Moonrise over Monument Valley / Wallpaper

“We do not inherit the land from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” / Navajo Proverb

John Ford Point … Monument Valley

4 Oct
Eagle Dance Song – Ronald Roybal – Native American Flute Music

John Ford Point … Monument Valley

“Director John Ford’s 1939 film Stagecoach, starring John Wayne, has had an enduring influence in making Monument Valley famous. After that first experience, Ford returned nine times to shoot Westerns — even when the films were not set in Arizona or Utah. A popular lookout point is named in his honor as “John Ford Point.””
– Travels with Grama http://www.travelswithgrama.com/travels/monvalley.htm

Below: John Ford’s Point: Shot from the new movie: The Lone Ranger - starring Johnny Depp and Arnie Hammer.

John Ford’s Point – Monument Valley – The Lone Ranger 2013

Director John Ford at John Ford Point – Monument Valley

John Ford / Great Western Directors

John Ford and John Wayne at Monument Valley

Stagecoach Poster

For a Few Dollars More … or less …

27 Sep

Soundtrack A fistful of Dollars / Ennio Morricone

A Fistful of Pesos ?? …

From Wikipedia – The Online Encyclopedia:

- 1964 – Clint Eastwood signed a contract for A Fistful of Dollars for $15,000 (US$112,403 in 2012 dollars) in wages for eleven weeks’ work, with a bonus of a Mercedes automobile upon completion.

- Sergio Leone intended Henry Fonda to play the “Man with No Name”. However, the production company could not afford to engage a major Hollywood star.

- Next, Leone offered Charles Bronson the part. He, too, declined the role, arguing that the script was bad.

- Both Fonda and Bronson would later star in Leone’s Once Upon a Time in the West (1968).

- Other actors who turned the role down were Henry Silva, Rory Calhoun, Tony Russel, Steve Reeves, Ty Hardin, James Coburn and Richard Harrison.

Soundtrack For a Few Dollars More / Ennio Morricone

For a few pesos more …

From Wikipedia – The Online Encyclopedia

- 1965 – Clint Eastwood received $50,000 for returning in the sequel For a Few Dollars More, while Lee Van Cleef received $17,000.

- Charles Bronson was again approached for a starring role, but he passed it up, citing that the sequel’s script was like the first film. Instead, Lee Van Cleef then accepted the role.

 - As all of the film’s footage was shot silent, Eastwood and Van Cleef returned to Italy where they dubbed over their dialogue and sound effects were added.

MFW:

One of my favorite things is to investigate who turned down – or lost out – on certain movie roles.

 For instance. Gary Cooper turned down The Big Trail, Stagecoach, and Red River. John Wayne took all three. Cooper carried on very nicely, but Wayne went on to become the Number One Star in Movies and possibly the greatest Western Star of all time.

“112,000 dollars” in 1964 for Clint – for 11 weeks work. And a Mercedes. Not bad at all actually – and he wasn’t even a star … yet. Though by todays Movie Star standards that might sound a bit weak. But as they say in Hollywood: “The only bad actor is an unemployed actor.”

Of course ‘nobody’ (if you’ll excuse the expression) had no idea of the success these movies would be – the start of the whole Spaghetti Western phenomenon. And very obviously – by the number of actors that turned these movies down – plenty of people didn’t think much of the opportunity.

But if Bronson hadn’t been so picky, Lee Van Cleef might very well have just faded away into the Western sunset.

Lancaster as Earp – the ‘Grin’ and the Grim

16 Jul
MFW LANCASTER THE GRIN

LANCASTER in ‘VERA CRUZ’  and “GUNFIGHT AT THE OK CORRAL’

In rebuilding my ‘Gunfight at the OK Corral‘ page I got to thinking about Lancaster’s portrayal of Wyatt Earp. In earlier films Lancaster had become famous for his trademark smile – which he is said to have referred to as “the grin” – most obvious in ‘Vera Cruz’ (one of My Favorite Westerns). Therefore his stoic and stern portrayal of Wyatt Earp in ‘Gunfight at the OK Corral’ is a stark and deliberate contrast. Was Earp really like this? Because this same humorless image of Earp is carried on through most of the other popular Earp Films: ‘Hour of the Gun‘; ‘Tomestone’ and ‘Wyatt Earp’. Only Henry Fonda‘s portrait of Earp in ‘My Darling Clementine‘ (1946) seems to put a more human face on Earp. Director John Sturges (‘Gunfight at the OK Corral’) continued with this strict image of Earp in ‘Hour of the Gun’ (1968) which starred James Garner as Earp. Garner’s ruthless portrayal of Earp is even more striking because of Garner’s usual soft and often comedic persona from the ‘Maverick’ TV series. It is safe to say however, that Sturges wasn’t very concerned with a historical portrayal of Earp (Lancaster doesn’t even sport a mustache) or the gunfight at the OK Corral. But it seems ironic that the film that makes the greatest effort to paint a historical document of Earp (Lawrence Kasdan‘s ‘Wyatt Earp’ starring Kevin Costner as Earp) is probably the least popular of five films.

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